Find It. Learn it. Do it.

Just a place I can sporadically post things that I may or may not do (most likely the latter).
SO I had a little surgery on my back and it hurts like HELLLLL. I’m gonna try to eat to help me heal! Just in case anyone is curious about what foods help with healing, here they are!
The Catabolic Phase
Even a small wound can alter the way your body metabolizes nutrients. As the body attempts to heal itself from a wound, it will create stress hormones and divert extra resources – carbohydrates, fats, proteins, antioxidants and more – to the creation of new tissue. This is referred to as the catabolic phase of healing. Your metabolism essentially speeds up during this process.
If the catabolic phase drags on too long, protein energy malnutrition (PEM) can set in. This begins a negative cycle which slows wound healing and deteriorates your health. Your body sends extra protein to deal with the wound and, as a consequence, other important body systems and organs don’t receive enough protein. This leads to reduced muscle mass and delayed wound healing.
Proper Nutrition in Wound Healing
Protein is the most important aspect of your diet when healing from a wound. Energy (calories from carbohydrates and fats), amino acids, antioxidants and minerals (zinc) are also important. Your dietary needs will be calculated on an individual basis, and your doctor or nutritionist may adjust the levels of each nutrient to facilitate healing. The following guidelines are only generalizations, but will give you an idea of what your diet should include.
Protein
Protein helps repair the damaged tissue from your wound. You’ll want to take in more protein than usual to help the healing process. This means 2 to 3 servings of protein a day, with each serving containing at least 2 to 3 ounces of meat (1 cup of beans or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter are alternatives). Your doctor will want to monitor your diet closely. If you don’t take in enough calories, the body might convert more of your body’s protein to energy instead of healing.
Fats
Fats from dairy products are essential for wound healing. Cell membranes are created with the use of fatty acids, and you’ll need to take in extra sources of these to maintain healing. Cooking oils and meats are also a good source of fats. One cup of milk or yogurt or an ounce of cheese would be good examples of how much you should include in your daily diet during the healing process.
Carbohydrates
Taking in plenty of carbohydrates is essential, to prevent the body from using other nutrients and protein for energy. Cereals, breads, rice and pasta are good sources of energy, and should be included in your daily diet.
Vitamin C
Vitamin C is an important antioxidant for wound healing. It increases the strength of the wound as it heals, and it helps with the creation of collagen in the skin. Vitamin C is also important in the creation of new blood vessels, and it helps with iron absorption. Citrus fruits and leafy green vegetables are great sources of vitamin C. You should be taking in up to 200 mg of vitamin C daily, which is fairly easy with at least one serving of these foods per day.
Vitamin A
Vitamin A is another crucial antioxidant. The body needs additional vitamin A to help with wound healing. It can help fight off infection, and aids in controlling the inflammatory response. Vitamin A levels have to be monitored closely, because toxicity can occur if too much is consumed. Red fruits and vegetables, eggs, fish and dark green vegetables are all good sources of vitamin A.
Zinc
Zinc helps the body synthesize proteins and develop collagen, so it is an important mineral for wound healing. As long as you are taking in sufficient amounts of protein from meats, you should be getting enough zinc in your diet. The level recommended by your doctor will vary from 15 to 50 mg per day.
Take extra care to follow your physician’s dietary advice, especially if it is a prescribed diet. Diabetic patients will have additional considerations when devising a nutritional plan with their doctor. A final note is needed to emphasize the importance of hydration for wound healing. Drink plenty of water and fluids throughout the healing process to help facilitate proper circulation and detoxification.

SO I had a little surgery on my back and it hurts like HELLLLL. I’m gonna try to eat to help me heal! Just in case anyone is curious about what foods help with healing, here they are!

The Catabolic Phase

Even a small wound can alter the way your body metabolizes nutrients. As the body attempts to heal itself from a wound, it will create stress hormones and divert extra resources – carbohydrates, fats, proteins, antioxidants and more – to the creation of new tissue. This is referred to as the catabolic phase of healing. Your metabolism essentially speeds up during this process.

If the catabolic phase drags on too long, protein energy malnutrition (PEM) can set in. This begins a negative cycle which slows wound healing and deteriorates your health. Your body sends extra protein to deal with the wound and, as a consequence, other important body systems and organs don’t receive enough protein. This leads to reduced muscle mass and delayed wound healing.

Proper Nutrition in Wound Healing

Protein is the most important aspect of your diet when healing from a wound. Energy (calories from carbohydrates and fats), amino acids, antioxidants and minerals (zinc) are also important. Your dietary needs will be calculated on an individual basis, and your doctor or nutritionist may adjust the levels of each nutrient to facilitate healing. The following guidelines are only generalizations, but will give you an idea of what your diet should include.

Protein

Protein helps repair the damaged tissue from your wound. You’ll want to take in more protein than usual to help the healing process. This means 2 to 3 servings of protein a day, with each serving containing at least 2 to 3 ounces of meat (1 cup of beans or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter are alternatives). Your doctor will want to monitor your diet closely. If you don’t take in enough calories, the body might convert more of your body’s protein to energy instead of healing.

Fats

Fats from dairy products are essential for wound healing. Cell membranes are created with the use of fatty acids, and you’ll need to take in extra sources of these to maintain healing. Cooking oils and meats are also a good source of fats. One cup of milk or yogurt or an ounce of cheese would be good examples of how much you should include in your daily diet during the healing process.

Carbohydrates

Taking in plenty of carbohydrates is essential, to prevent the body from using other nutrients and protein for energy. Cereals, breads, rice and pasta are good sources of energy, and should be included in your daily diet.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an important antioxidant for wound healing. It increases the strength of the wound as it heals, and it helps with the creation of collagen in the skin. Vitamin C is also important in the creation of new blood vessels, and it helps with iron absorption. Citrus fruits and leafy green vegetables are great sources of vitamin C. You should be taking in up to 200 mg of vitamin C daily, which is fairly easy with at least one serving of these foods per day.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is another crucial antioxidant. The body needs additional vitamin A to help with wound healing. It can help fight off infection, and aids in controlling the inflammatory response. Vitamin A levels have to be monitored closely, because toxicity can occur if too much is consumed. Red fruits and vegetables, eggs, fish and dark green vegetables are all good sources of vitamin A.

Zinc

Zinc helps the body synthesize proteins and develop collagen, so it is an important mineral for wound healing. As long as you are taking in sufficient amounts of protein from meats, you should be getting enough zinc in your diet. The level recommended by your doctor will vary from 15 to 50 mg per day.

Take extra care to follow your physician’s dietary advice, especially if it is a prescribed diet. Diabetic patients will have additional considerations when devising a nutritional plan with their doctor. A final note is needed to emphasize the importance of hydration for wound healing. Drink plenty of water and fluids throughout the healing process to help facilitate proper circulation and detoxification.

Trying to find ways to style my newly chopped hairdo. This looks promising. I was going to donate to Locks of Love but there are other places to donate to, too! 
Braiding Short Hair
Start with clean, air-dryed hair and find a good side-part. If your hair is naturally wavy or curly you can skip the next step.
Curl your hair with a 1″ barrell iron. Why curl your hair when you’re just going to put it up? Curl helps braids to stay in place. If you add some quick curls to straight hair before braiding, the hairs tend to “hug” each other a little more and not pop out of the braid as much.
Pour a nickel or quarter sized dab of Pantene Beautiful Lengths Strengthen & Smooth Finishing Creme between your palms and rub it around. This will give the hair a little help with hold and add some texture.
Work it into your hair from the roots to ends.
Next, clip off the front sections. These sections should start behind your ear and go up to the front hairline (see photo). Do the same thing on both sides.
Then you’re going to roll the hair in back. Start behind the ear– “gather + roll, gather + roll, gather + roll”. Spray + pin as you go if you need to. Once you get that roll to the bottom, cross over your neck + bobbypin it.
Do the exact same roll on the opposite side. Cross over the neck and bobby pin it (see photo).
This is what the back should look like once you’ve pinned those pieces into place. See how they overlap a little? You want the pieces to cross. Be sure to roll them tight and pin them well. This might take a little practice, but once you get it, it’s very easy.
Alright, now diagonally divide the heavier front section. You’ll want to run 2 braids side by side. Start with the one that will be higher up. I like an inside-out braid for this look because inside-out braids look fuller.
Once you get the braid to the back, twist the tail and pin it into your twists in the back.
Repeat this process for the front braid…
and pin it to the back as well.
The other side can be twisted, braided, just pulled back and pinned– whatever you think looks best. We just pulled it back and pinned it into the twists in back.
Check the back in a hand mirror for any random runaway pieces, then spray it with a strong holding hairspray.

Trying to find ways to style my newly chopped hairdo. This looks promising. I was going to donate to Locks of Love but there are other places to donate to, too! 

Braiding Short Hair

  1. Start with clean, air-dryed hair and find a good side-part. If your hair is naturally wavy or curly you can skip the next step.
  2. Curl your hair with a 1″ barrell iron. Why curl your hair when you’re just going to put it up? Curl helps braids to stay in place. If you add some quick curls to straight hair before braiding, the hairs tend to “hug” each other a little more and not pop out of the braid as much.
  3. Pour a nickel or quarter sized dab of Pantene Beautiful Lengths Strengthen & Smooth Finishing Creme between your palms and rub it around. This will give the hair a little help with hold and add some texture.
  4. Work it into your hair from the roots to ends.
  5. Next, clip off the front sections. These sections should start behind your ear and go up to the front hairline (see photo). Do the same thing on both sides.
  6. Then you’re going to roll the hair in back. Start behind the ear– “gather + roll, gather + roll, gather + roll”. Spray + pin as you go if you need to. Once you get that roll to the bottom, cross over your neck + bobbypin it.
  7. Do the exact same roll on the opposite side. Cross over the neck and bobby pin it (see photo).
  8. This is what the back should look like once you’ve pinned those pieces into place. See how they overlap a little? You want the pieces to cross. Be sure to roll them tight and pin them well. This might take a little practice, but once you get it, it’s very easy.
  9. Alright, now diagonally divide the heavier front section. You’ll want to run 2 braids side by side. Start with the one that will be higher up. I like an inside-out braid for this look because inside-out braids look fuller.
  10. Once you get the braid to the back, twist the tail and pin it into your twists in the back.
  11. Repeat this process for the front braid…
  12. and pin it to the back as well.
  13. The other side can be twisted, braided, just pulled back and pinned– whatever you think looks best. We just pulled it back and pinned it into the twists in back.
  14. Check the back in a hand mirror for any random runaway pieces, then spray it with a strong holding hairspray.
I’m so sad I didn’t get to do this braid before chopping off all my hair!! Oh well. I’ll do it in 2 years when it grows back out again, i guess 
Fishtail, French Braid Combo
Create a side part first. Then on the heavier side, clip up a section of hair about the size you see in photo 1. You’ll save that for later to create your fishtail.
Start in the back behind one of your ears and french braid all the way across to the opposite shoulder.
Once you get to the shoulder, turn the french braid into a regular braid that will fall in front of your shoulder.
Next, take down the clipped up section and create a basic fishtail braid. Secure it with a small clear elastic when you’re done.
Take the fishtail and wrap it around your head toward the back. Tuck it into the french braid and pull the tail through (see photo 5)
Now take the tail of the fishtail that may be hanging out and work it into the french braid. Pin it in place.
Gently pull the fishtail braid and the french braid apart to give it a little more texture and softeness. I love to spray my braid lightly with a soft ocean spray like Wella Ocean Spritz before I pull it apart. It gives it a little extra hold so I don’t end up unraveling my whole braid.
Pull out some pieces out around the front to give it a more romantic feel (optional), then do a veil of fine mist hair spray like Oribe Superfine or Elnett.

I’m so sad I didn’t get to do this braid before chopping off all my hair!! Oh well. I’ll do it in 2 years when it grows back out again, i guess 

Fishtail, French Braid Combo

  1. Create a side part first. Then on the heavier side, clip up a section of hair about the size you see in photo 1. You’ll save that for later to create your fishtail.
  2. Start in the back behind one of your ears and french braid all the way across to the opposite shoulder.
  3. Once you get to the shoulder, turn the french braid into a regular braid that will fall in front of your shoulder.
  4. Next, take down the clipped up section and create a basic fishtail braid. Secure it with a small clear elastic when you’re done.
  5. Take the fishtail and wrap it around your head toward the back. Tuck it into the french braid and pull the tail through (see photo 5)
  6. Now take the tail of the fishtail that may be hanging out and work it into the french braid. Pin it in place.
  7. Gently pull the fishtail braid and the french braid apart to give it a little more texture and softeness. I love to spray my braid lightly with a soft ocean spray like Wella Ocean Spritz before I pull it apart. It gives it a little extra hold so I don’t end up unraveling my whole braid.
  8. Pull out some pieces out around the front to give it a more romantic feel (optional), then do a veil of fine mist hair spray like Oribe Superfine or Elnett.
5 Minute Necklace Headband DIY
Materials:
• Necklace or chain (about 18 inches long)• Elastic hair tie• Needle nose pliers
Steps:
• Using needle nose pliers, bend open one of the the jump rings/links at the end of your necklace or chain. (Tip: If your necklace does not have links that can easily open, add your own jump ring at the end) • Insert the elastic hair tie into the ring and close it back with pliers. If the ring does not close tightly, try overlapping the edges so that the elastic tie does not slide out.• On the other end of the necklace, open the lobster clasp and insert the elastic tie inside.• If it fits snugly on your head, then you’re all set. If not, try using a different size elastic tie to adjust.

5 Minute Necklace Headband DIY

Materials:

• Necklace or chain (about 18 inches long)
• Elastic hair tie
• Needle nose pliers

Steps:

• Using needle nose pliers, bend open one of the the jump rings/links at the end of your necklace or chain. (Tip: If your necklace does not have links that can easily open, add your own jump ring at the end) 
• Insert the elastic hair tie into the ring and close it back with pliers. If the ring does not close tightly, try overlapping the edges so that the elastic tie does not slide out.
• On the other end of the necklace, open the lobster clasp and insert the elastic tie inside.
• If it fits snugly on your head, then you’re all set. If not, try using a different size elastic tie to adjust.

I thought I had posted this a LONG time ago but I guess not. I impulsively cut off 12 inches of hair about 30 minutes ago using this method (#4 in my case) and it turned out well! Just wanted to share in case there are other nuts out there that like to cut their own hair :) 
Happy Cutting! Link

I thought I had posted this a LONG time ago but I guess not. I impulsively cut off 12 inches of hair about 30 minutes ago using this method (#4 in my case) and it turned out well! Just wanted to share in case there are other nuts out there that like to cut their own hair :) 

Happy Cutting! Link

foodfuckery:

Brownie S’mores in a Jar.

Recipe

It’s not any time near V-day but who needs an occasion to make Brownie S’mores in a Jar? It’s always the right time to make brownies. ALWAYS.